Proposed Commercial/Residential complex on Carlisle Street in Gettysburg moves forward

A plan for a 186-unit residential/commercial development on the 2-acre parcel behind the Gettysburg Transit Center between Carlisle and Stratton Streets will be considered by the Gettysburg Planning Commission on Tuesday evening. The public is invited to attend.

The proposed project includes two three-story buildings with 8 apartments each in addition to a 7-story building with 170 units.  The units will include a combination of studio, 1-bedrooom, and 2-bedroom apartments.

harrison plan

The proposal also includes retail and restaurant space.

The project also includes parking and a proposed extension of the Gettysburg Inner Loop bicycle-pedestrian trail.

The developer is also purchasing the existing Rabbit Transit Center site on Carlisle St. The Transit Center would be relocated to Stratton Street.

The proposal, from Landcore Engineering Consultants of Philadelphia, is requesting a special exception for two issues related to building sizes.

The developer is requesting that, rather than having a setback on upper floors as required by current zoning, the entire 7-story building be built on a smaller footprint.  According to the application, this provides the benefit of additional green space while the upper stories of the building would remain in the same location.

The developer is also asking for a variance to allow a lower (one-story) minimum height for the relocated Transit Center, saying a 24-foot building as currently required “would not be in character of the surrounding properties.”

The property, which has been vacant since at least 2001, was extensively developed by the Adams County Industrial Development Authority before being sold to the developer in 2021.

The 7-story building would be centered on the site with as much separation as possible from streets and existing homes.

The proposal will also be considered at a Gettysburg  Zoning Commission meeting to be held on June 28 and will be considered by the Historical Architectural Review Board (HARB) at its July meeting.

Borough councilmember Matt Moon said the developer had been “extraordinarily respectful of the borough’s wishes.  He has peppered the project with Christmas presents for the borough including infrastructure improvements,” he said.

chuck

Charles (Chuck) Stangor is Gettysburg Connection's Owner, Publisher, and Editor in Chief. I would like to hear from you. Please contact me at cstangor@gettysburgconnection.org.

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Peggy Rock
Peggy Rock
11 months ago

Historical sites all around the world have fought this type of development for years. The images are even worse than I feared. Today in Gettysburg, because of generations of people who fought to keep Gettysburg intact and now full of concrete 7-9 story buildings – who fought to keep existing structures – you can still stand at the Lincoln Train Station or on Lincoln Square and look west and imagine what it would have been like. That will end with this construction and Gettysburg will never look the same. And it will never be the same. And let’s not forget… Read more »

ERice
ERice
11 months ago

This project could fit into our town with a more historical design rather than a blocky modern building. This is so disappointing. I love the idea of incorporating parking and a park, but the square complex with no Victorian/Colonial flair or artistry is terrible.

Colleen Stevens
Colleen Stevens
11 months ago

Gettysburg is being overbuilt. It’s losing the small town historic feel, and that’s why people come here. As a business owner in Gettysburg, I have seen a tremendous change in the 6 years we’ve owned our business and in the18 years I’ve lived here. 7 stories anywhere near downtown is a horrible idea.

Peggy Rock
Peggy Rock
11 months ago

This project is worse than the prospect of a casino in Gettysburg. At least that would not have been in the heart of town. Frankly, I would just as soon see a casino on this site as 185 apartments. And it’s not a 7-story building but 7 stories plus an additional 12 feet for mechanicals. That’s 84 feet high. Code allows 48. The impact on infrastructure and parking alone is outrageous. Where exactly are all these tenants and their guests going to park? The plan doesn’t accommodate them – just refers to some “subterranean” parking. What was council thinking when… Read more »

Susan Cipperly
Susan Cipperly
11 months ago

People need to attend the Planning Commission meeting at 7:00 p.m. on Tuesday to hear what the developer is proposing. Planning Commission meetings are not broadcast or recorded. This is a major project. One aspect is mentioned below. The Transit Station currently is the only place on Carlisle Street that provides readily accessible public, ADA compliant, restrooms. It will be replaced by a building with commercial space on the first floor and residential above. The Transit Station will be rebuilt across N. Stratton Street — quite a hike from Carlisle St. Borough Council has been discussing the need for public… Read more »

Keith Mcgill
Keith Mcgill
11 months ago

7 stories does not, and never will, fit into historic downtown Gettysburg.

Peggy Rock
Peggy Rock
11 months ago
Reply to  Keith Mcgill

Amen!!

Jeann Duffy
Jeann Duffy
11 months ago

Are any of these apartments designated for low-income people?

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