Gettysburg’s Lincoln Cemetery among 13 PA African American cemeteries to receive assistance

Pennsylvania Hallowed Grounds and Preservation Pennsylvania are pleased to announce grant awards to 13 African American cemeteries to assist in their ongoing preservation efforts as part of an African American Cemetery Stewardship Program funded by the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund (AACHAF) through the National Trust for Historic Preservation with support from The JPB Foundation (NTHP) and The 1772 Foundation.

Selected grantees will work with a professional consultant who will help each site to develop a plan to assist the cemetery stewards with prioritizing maintenance, interpretation, and preservation needs. The consultant will also assist with identifying and preparing specifications for priority tasks that address key cemetery needs. Cemeteries receiving a direct grant will undertake the most needed preservation or conservation work. Board members of Pennsylvania Hallowed Grounds will work with cemetery stewards and consultants to create a collaborative effort to ensure the long-term preservation of these important sites.

Lincoln Cemetery, also known as Good Will Cemetery, is located between South Washington Street and Long Lane, adjacent to the Gettysburg Rec Park, and within walking distance from the Soldiers National Cemetery.

The following cemeteries will receive assistance:

African Union Church of South Coventry (Chester County)
Byberry Township African American Burial Ground (Philadelphia County) Eastern Light Cemetery (Blair County)
Green Lawn Cemetery (Delaware County)
Lincoln Cemetery (Adams County)
Lincoln Cemetery (Dauphin County)
Lindley Hill Cemetery (Chester County)
Mount Vernon Cemetery (Franklin County)
Payne Chapel AME Church Cemetery (Washington County)
Thornbury AME Cemetery (Delaware County)
Union Cemetery (Centre County)
Zion Hill Cemetery (Lancaster County)

Zion Union Cemetery (Franklin County)

This funding will support the growth of the African American Cemetery Stewards Network, a program of Pennsylvania Hallowed Grounds. The network is a great resource for anyone undertaking the preservation and maintenance of these precious places in Pennsylvania. Over one hundred African American cemeteries have been identified in Pennsylvania, telling an underrepresented part of our history. These sites are also the final resting place of Black veterans, including many of the 8,612 Pennsylvania men who served with the United States Colored Troops. These cemeteries are threatened by underfunding, development, and changing demographics. The grants will provide direct assistance, offer training and technical assistance to the larger community of cemetery stewards, help build public awareness, and identify additional funding to preserve this heritage.

Pennsylvania Hallowed Ground, in partnership with Preservation Pennsylvania, is one of 33 organizations to receive a total of $3 million in grant funding to advance ongoing preservation activities for historic places such as sites, museums, and landscapes that represent African American cultural heritage. With more than $80 million in funding, the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund is the largest U.S. resource dedicated to the preservation of African American historic places. Pennsylvania Hallowed Grounds Chair Barbara Barksdale,

Mindy Gulden Crawford, Executive Director of Preservation Pennsylvania, stated, “We are honored that this grant will help us assist African American cemeteries in Pennsylvania and to have Pennsylvania Hallowed Grounds as our strong partner,”

ABOUT THE AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURAL HERITAGE ACTION FUND FROM THE NATIONAL TRUST FOR HISTORIC PRESERVATION
Now in its fifth year, the Action Fund has supported 160 places through its National Grant Program for a total investment of $12.4 million. This year’s list further demonstrates the beauty and complexity of African American life, and includes historic sites tied to Black arts, culture, civic engagement, entrepreneurship, sports, medicine, education, religion, and social justice. These often-overlooked places hold aspects of history that must be protected—and used to draw inspiration and wisdom for the benefit of all Americans. To learn more about this program, visit savingplaces.org/actionfund.

ABOUT THE 1772 FOUNDATION

“Pennsylvania’s African American cemeteries are deserving of this assistance from the Pennsylvania Hallowed Grounds and our partner Preservation Pennsylvania. The hallowed grounds that cradle our ancestors will be preserved for future generations to visit, research, and honor.”

The 1772 Foundation works to ensure the safe passage of our historic assets to future generations.

ABOUT PRESERVATION PENNSYLVANIA

Preservation Pennsylvania is the Commonwealth’s only private statewide nonprofit organization dedicated to helping people protect and preserve the historic places that matter to them. Preservation Pennsylvania was established by the Commonwealth’s General Assembly in 1982 as the Preservation Fund of Pennsylvania, a statewide revolving fund to assist in the acquisition and rehabilitation of historic properties. Since then, Preservation Pennsylvania has grown into its role as a private, nonprofit membership organization with a statewide mission to protect and preserve Pennsylvania’s irreplaceable historic places.

ABOUT PENNSYLVANIA HALLOWED GROUNDS

The mission of Pennsylvania Hallowed Grounds https://pahallowedgrounds.org
is to honor, interpret, and preserve African American cemeteries and the burial sites of Civil War African American Sailors and United States Colored Troops in Pennsylvania. PAHG connects and builds the capacity of stewards of these cemeteries and burial sites and supports conservation, documentation, education, and training. Working collaboratively with other groups and organizations, PAHG provides tangible encounters with memory and enriches the public understanding of history. For more information, contact PAHG@pahallowedgrounds.org

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Beth Farnham
Beth Farnham
10 months ago

This is good news. Of additional interest is the cemetery that used to exist at 311 York Street, next to the bicycle shop. Andrew Dalton wrote about it here: https://cupola.gettysburg.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1536&context=student_scholarship

Susan Cipperly
Susan Cipperly
10 months ago
Reply to  Beth Farnham

Interesting article. Thanks, Beth

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